Parent Materials Mode of Deposition in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut

View a larger version of this image (jpg).  (Bog)
Bog
Peat deposit resulting from accumulation of vegetative (organic) materials. Mesic and fibric sedge and moss peat.


View a larger version of this image (jpg).  (Colluvial)
Colluvial
Regosolic Turbic Cryosol associated with colluviated valley


View a larger version of this image (jpg).  (Morainal)
Morainal
Orthic Turbic Cryosol associated with bedrock-controlled till landscape


View a larger version of this image (jpg).  (Morainal)
Morainal
Morainal material deposited by ice. A mixture of boulders, stones, sand, silt and clay.


View a larger version of this image (jpg).  (Colluvial)
Colluvial
Perennially frozen, loamy-textured, colluviated till. The material is underlain by thick ground ice.


View a larger version of this image (jpg).  (Colluvial)
Colluvial
Thin veneer of colluvium over limestone bedrock. The colluvium consists mainly of rock fragments, sand, silt and clay.


View a larger version of this image (jpg).  (Lacustrine)
Lacustrine
Lacustrine material deposited by glacial lake water. Mostly silt and clay.


View a larger version of this image (jpg).  (Morainal)
Morainal
Perennially frozen, shallow morainal material (till) underlain by granitic bedrock. The loamy textured material is affected by downslope movement.